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Frequently Asked Questions

Exposing the truth one question and answer at a time.
About Wolf-dogs, wolfdogs and wolf-dog hybrids

Short answer: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the genus Canis, of the dog family Canidae, especially C. lupus, usually hunting in packs, formerly common throughout the Northern Hemisphere but now chiefly restricted to the more unpopulated parts of its range. ~ Dictionary.com

Long answer: The characteristics of a wolf (in alphabetical order):

Here are a couple of questions for you:

Short answer: Domestic dogs are sometimes referred to as "man's best friend" because they are kept as domestic pets and are usually loyal and like being around humans.

Long answer: Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are domesticated mammals, not natural wild animals. They were originally bred from wolves. They have been bred by humans for a long time, and were the first animals ever to be domesticated. They are a popular pet because they are usually playful, friendly, loyal and listen to humans.

Short answer: "Wolf-Dog" and "Wolf-Dog Hybrid" are terms used when referring to a canine that is reported to be part wolf and part domestic dog.

Long answer: (in development)

A wolf-dog is a canine resulting from the crossbreeding of a wolf and domestic dog, a wolf and wolf-dog, a wolf-dog and wolf-dog or a wolf-dog and domestic dog. The degree of "wolf" looks and behaviors in a wolf-dog can range from "indistinguishable from a wild wolf" (Very High Content) to, at the other end of the spectrum, "domestic dog for all intent and purposes" (Very Low Content).

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Phenotype Value:

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Influential "Variables"

The observable physical and behavioral characteristics of a wolf-dog are influenced by:

  • Ancestry
  • Genetic outcome
  • Hybrid Vigor (Heterosis)
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Territorial history
  • Environmental history
  • Physical activity history
  • Human interaction history
  • Human relationships history
  • Canine interaction history
  • Canine relationships history
  • Diet history
  • Medical treatment history
  • Individual personality

Note: differences in adult wolf-dogs, even among siblings, can be astounding.

Click to see "The Breeders"

Click to see "The Promoters"

Click to see "The Nonprofits"

Click to see "The Supply Chain"

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: That is FALSE.

Long answer: A little critical thinking and Googling will quickly invalidate that often regurgitated wolf-dog breeder and promoter propaganda. The truth is, wild wolf pups continue to make it into the hands of people (hunters, trappers, government workers, campers, den robbers, etc., etc.) that venture into or around areas where wolf packs den.

Short answer: No

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: Actual wolf content.

Long answer:

"Designer High-Content Wolf-Dogs" are offspring from successful attempts to achieve "wolfy" looks with user-friendly "doggy" behaviors by crossbreeding wolf-dog/wolf-dog or wolf-dog/domestic dog pairs. And yes, "successful attempts" begs the question; what will life be like for the unsuccessful outcomes?

The breeding of wolf-dogs condemns "wild genes" to a frustrating life of captivity.

"True High-Content Wolf-Dogs", on the other hand, are offspring with a high wolf DNA genetic outcome resulting from a relatively recent, to a very recent, crossbreeding with a full wolf. True High-Content Wolf-Dogs present with "raw" wolf behaviors and are usually indistinguishable from wolves in the wild.

Short answer: No

Long answer: Wolf-dogs have very inconsistent ancestry, wolf content, looks and behaviors.

Short answer: It depends on numerous factors. For one, and it is a big one, it appears the ingredients and portions that make up the "DNA Cocktail" of the wolf-dog in question is a significant factor.

Long answer: Wolf-dogs are susceptible to a variety of physical and psychological health issues.

Factors include:
  • Ancestry
  • Inbreeding
  • Linebreeding
  • Outbreeding
  • Genetic Outcome
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Environment
  • Physical Activity
  • Human Relationships
  • Canine Relationships
  • Diet
  • Medical Treatments
Health issues include:
  • Genetic Disorders
  • Neurological Disorders
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Cancer
  • Tumors
  • Physical Deformity
  • Joint Problems
  • Aural Insufficiency
  • Ocular Insufficiency
  • Coat Insufficiency
  • Epidermal Insufficiency
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Dysphoric Mania
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Frustration

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Wolf-Dog in Exotic Pet Trade
The face of an exotic pet trade.

Short answer: Yes

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: We are not against acceptable current wolf-dog ownership. We are against wolf-dog breeding and trafficking.

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: No

Long answer: (state by state)

Click to see "The Wolf-Dog Circus"

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: It depends — not usually.

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: "Nonprofit" organizations have evolved to need, and depend on, a continuous supply of "wolves" in order to facilitate longevity and the "wolf lifestyle" (afforded by spellbound customers) they have come to enjoy.

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: A wolf-dog of questionable wolf content used to engage the public.

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: Wolf-Dog breeders and traffickers control access to the "wolves" that wolf-dog and wolf rescues, refuges, parks, sanctuaries, centers, etc., etc., continually need and use to attract the public and their money.

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: Wolf-dog and wolf "nonprofits" are an integral part of perpetrating and perpetuating the Wolf-Dog Circus via their access to, and influence on, the public.

Long answer: (in development)

Note: Reasonably objective, critical thinking, empathetic and compassionate people find the entire industry completely repugnant. And make no mistake, it is an industry where "wolves" (wolf-dogs) are the product and a misled cash wielding "spellbound" public is the customer.

Short answer: (in development)

Long answer: (in development)

Short answer: People. And it starts at the top.

Long answer:

  1. State Legislators (lawmakers) that fail to implement anti-breeding and anti-trafficking laws and regulations
  2. Wolf and wolf-dog Breeders
  3. Wolf and wolf-dog Nonprofits
  4. Wolf and wolf-dog Promoters
  5. Wolf and wolf-dog Wannabe Owners

Short answer: No

Long answer: (in development)

Make it a criminal offense to:

  1. Privately breed any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA
  2. Privately sell any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA
  3. Privately traffic any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA
  4. Privately advertise any canine described as part or pure (full) "Wolf"
  5. Privately solicit for any canine described as part or pure (full) "Wolf"
  6. Privately export any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA
  7. Privately import any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA
  8. Privately possess any canine that tests* positive for Wolf DNA without a special permit which defines and enforces specific requirements (permit to be defined in adjunct documentation)

* An accurate Wolf DNA Test has not yet be selected. Among others, we are considering the UC Davis "VGL wolf-hybrid test" and the Embark "Breed Ancestry test".

Note: "Wolf-dog" is not a breed so this IS NOT Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) as the wolf-dog breeders, promotors, for-profits and many, if not all, "nonprofits" want the public to believe.


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